Agriculture

Agricultural program graduates are in high demand and have many career opportunities locally, regionally and nationally. The agricultural sector is the largest employer in Grant County, accounting for 27% of jobs countywide (Washington State Employment Security Department). The agricultural sector in our area alone provides our graduates access to opportunities in areas such as management, processing,  crop production, and agricultural sales and services.

Students have the option of selecting from a transfer degree including three articulated pathways with Washington State University programs or a non-transfer degree that is supported by local industry to meet their training needs for graduates entering the workforce.  To learn more about our degree options, please click the button below.

Program Outcomes
Career Possibilities
Transfer Options
Industry Connections
Scholarships & Grants
  1. Students will show knowledge of workplace safety when handling food, chemical/pesticides, and equipment.
  2. Students will select and use the appropriate precision and software application technology.
  3. Students will demonstrate critical-thinking and problem-solving skills as they make decisions in agricultural management situations.
  4. Students will demonstrate knowledge of scientific principles when applied to a variety of crop production systems.
  5. Students will demonstrate application of agricultural knowledge and resources to solve problems and perform relevant activities.
  6. Students will demonstrate knowledge of business principles when applied to agricultural businesses and operations.
  7. Students will collect and evaluate data from various technologies and make management decisions from the data collected.
  8. Students will apply the rules, protocols, and safety required to operate an unmanned aerial system for commercial agriculture purposes.
  9. Students will be able to communicate clearly and effectively within a workplace context.
  10.  Students will be able to reason mathematically using methods appropriate to the profession.
  11. Students will be able to demonstrate teamwork and/or workplace specific skills related to human relations.
  • Agronomist
  • Ag Marketing & Sales
  • Agricultural Production Manager
  • Crop Consultant
  • Crop Insurance Specialist
  • Farm/Ranch Manager
  • Field Representative
  • Agriculture Researcher
  • Agriculture Lobbyist
  • Food Safety Manager
  • Water Conservationist
  • Agriculture Food Scientist
  • Soil Engineer
  • WSDA Employee

For job shadows, tours, and internships, check out the Career Services.

Big Bend Community College is located in the heart of Grant County – ranked as the number one county in Washington for market value of agricultural production (U.S. Dept. of Agriculture 2012 Census).

BBCC Scholarships

The following scholarships are available through the Big Bend Community College Foundation https://bbcc.awardspring.com/. Listed below are the agriculture-specific scholarships. Applying for the foundation scholarships will make you eligible for these scholarships as well as many others.

  • Barry Kirkwood Scholarship
    Preference to student majoring in agriculture or a related program of study.  If no qualified applicant in the agriculture field, scholarship will be awarded at the discretion of the selection committee.
  • Charles (Chuck) Huston Memorial Scholarship
    Second year, academic track student in agriculture or the sciences (hard sciences—not social sciences).  Applicant must have a 3.0 to be considered for the scholarship.  Economic need of student is equally important as grade point.  Applicants are encouraged to have completed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at www.fafsa.gov or the Washington Application for State Financial Aid (WASFA) at http://readysetgrad.org/wasfa to assist in the selection process.
  • DeForest “Huck” Fuller/Moses Lake Grange Scholarship
    Preference given to descendants of Grange members, students from farm families, or students from families who work in agriculture-related industries.  Minimum GPA to apply is 3.0 in high school or 2.75 in college.  Must maintain a GPA of 2.75 at BBCC.  Applicant must be a resident of Grant County for a minimum of three years. 
  • Ferne Daniel Family Scholarship
    Education or Agriculture major, meet financial eligibility as determined by the Financial Aid Office, applying for first year at BBCC, with the scholarship renewable for the 2nd year to the same student, if needed.  Applicants are encouraged to have completed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at www.fafsa.gov or the Washington Application for State Financial Aid (WASFA) at http://readysetgrad.org/wasfa to assist in the selection process.
  • John Michael Shinn Memorial Scholarship
    One year scholarship for a 2nd-year student majoring in Agriculture and/or the sciences (hard sciences—not social sciences).  Student must show promise of developing into a creative thinker and experimenter.  NOTE: Applicants for this scholarship must attach a written explanation of qualifications with the criteria. Please attach to the completed application.  In addition, please provide supported explanation or references from the community.
  • Paul Hirai family Scholarship
    Open to potential and current BBCC students.  First preference given to members of farm families. Agriculture major or program related to occupations serving production agriculture. 
  • White Tail Grange Scholarship
    Must be a resident of the BBCC service district for at least five years and a graduate of a high school in the service district.  Minimum GPA to apply is 3.0 in high school or 2.75 in college.  First preference is given to members of farm families. Agriculture major or program related to occupations serving production agriculture. 
  • Washington State Potato Commission
    This full-time scholarship is available to academic-track students in Agriculture. Students must be in good standing with a GPA of 2.5 or better.
  • Northwest Farm Credit Services
    This scholarship is available to Agriculture majors with a GPA of 2.5 or higher.

BBCC Scholarships

Workforce Education Services

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Degrees & Certificates

AAS Ag Technology & Management (non-transfer: AG Business)

Total Credits: 113
Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will be able to communicate clearly and effectively within a workplace context.
  • Students will be able to reason mathematically using methods appropriate to the profession.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate teamwork and/or workplace specific skills related to human relations.
  • Students will demonstrate critical-thinking and problem-solving skills as they make decisions in agricultural management situations
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of scientific principles when applied to a variety of crop production systems
  • Students will show knowledge of workplace safety when handling food, chemical/pesticides, and equipment.
  • Students will select and use the appropriate precision and software application technology

Year 1

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter
Summer Quarter

Course Credits
AGR 101 2
AGR 261 5
BUS& 101 5
MAP 103/117/BUS 102 5

Course Credits
AGR 263 5
ACCT& 105 5
BUS 120 4

Course Credits
AGR 212 5
BIM 110 3
ECON& 201 5

Course Credits
AGR 295 5
AGR 297 1

Year 2

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter
Summer Quarter

Course Credits
ACCT 262 2
AGR 120 5
AGR 241 5
ENGL 109 3

Course Credits
AGR 272 5
BUS 200 5
CMST 100 4
FAD 150 2

Course Credits
AGR 271 5
BUS 170 5
Approved Elective 5

Course Credits
AGR 295 (5 credits) and AGR 297 (1 credit) or
CDL 100 (17 credits)
6-17

AAS Ag Technology & Management (non-transfer: Agronomy)

Total Credits: 114
Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will be able to communicate clearly and effectively within a workplace context.
  • Students will be able to reason mathematically using methods appropriate to the profession.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate teamwork and/or workplace specific skills related to human relations.
  • Students will demonstrate critical-thinking and problem-solving skills as they make decisions in agricultural management situations
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of scientific principles when applied to a variety of crop production systems
  • Students will show knowledge of workplace safety when handling food, chemical/pesticides, and equipment.
  • Students will select and use the appropriate precision and software application technology

Year 1

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter
Summer Quarter

Course Credits
AGR 101 2
AGR 261 5
ENGL 109 3
MAP 117 5

Course Credits
AGR 110 3
AGR 263 5
BIM 110 3
BIM 120 4

Course Credits
AGR 251 5
CMST 100 4
ECON& 201 5

Course Credits
AGR 295 (5 credits) and AGR 297 (1 credit) or
CDL 100 (17 credits)
6-17

Year 2

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter
Summer Quarter

Course Credits
AGR 120 5
AGR 241 5
AGR 265 5

Course Credits
AGR 272 5
BUS 200 5
CHEM& 105 5
FAD 150 2

Course Credits
AGR 211 5
AGR 212 5
AGR 271 5

Course Credits
AGR 295 (5 credits) and AGR 297 (1 credit) or
CDL 100 (17 credits)
6-17

AAS Ag Technology & Management (non-transfer: Unmanned Systems)

Total Credits: 123
Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will be able to communicate clearly and effectively within a workplace context.
  • Students will be able to reason mathematically using methods appropriate to the profession.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate teamwork and/or workplace specific skills related to human relations.
  • Students will demonstrate critical-thinking and problem-solving skills as they make decisions in agricultural management situations
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of scientific principles when applied to a variety of crop production systems
  • Students will show knowledge of workplace safety when handling food, chemical/pesticides, and equipment.
  • Students will select and use the appropriate precision and software application technology

Year 1

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter
Summer Quarter

Course Credits
AGR 101 2
AGR 261 5
MAP 103/117/BUS 102 5
UMS 112 5

Course Credits
AGR 263 5
ECON& 201 5
GIS 110 4

Course Credits
AGR 212 5
BIM 110 3
UMS 142 6
BUS 120 4

Course Credits
AGR 295 5
AGR 297 1

Year 2

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter
Summer Quarter

Course Credits
AGR 120 5
AGR 241 5
ENGL 109 3

Course Credits
AGR 272 5
BUS 200 4
CMST 100 4
GIS 210 3

Course Credits
AGR 271 5
FAD 150 2
GIS 220 3
UMS 107 2

Course Credits
AGR 295 (5 credits) and AGR 297 (1 credit) or
CDL 100 (17 credits)
6-17

AAS-T Agricultural Science (WSU transfer: Field Crop Management)

Total Credits: 105
Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will be able to communicate clearly and effectively within a workplace context.
  • Students will be able to reason mathematically using methods appropriate to the profession.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate teamwork and/or workplace specific skills related to human relations.
  • Students will demonstrate critical-thinking and problem-solving skills as they make decisions in
    agricultural management situations
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of scientific principles when applied to a variety of crop production systems

Year 1

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter
Summer Quarter

Course Credits
AGR 101 2
AGR261 5
ENGL& 101 5
MATH& 141 5

Course Credits
ART& 100 5
BOT 130 5
FAD 150 2
MATH& 142 5

Course Credits
AGR 212 5
ECON& 201 5
HIST& 116 or 118 5
MATH& 146 5

Course Credits
AGR 295 5
AGR 297 1

Year 2

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter

Course Credits
AGR 241 5
ANTH& 100 5
CHEM& 161 5

Course Credits
AGR 263 5
CMST& 220 5
CHEM& 162 5

Course Credits
AGR 251 5
CHEM& 163 5
PSYC& 100 or SOC& 101 5

AAS-T Agricultural Science (WSU transfer: Agricultural & Food Business Economics)

Total Credits: 105
Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will be able to communicate clearly and effectively within a workplace context.
  • Students will be able to reason mathematically using methods appropriate to the profession.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate teamwork and/or workplace specific skills related to human relations.
  • Students will demonstrate critical-thinking and problem-solving skills as they make decisions in
    agricultural management situations
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of scientific principles when applied to a variety of crop production systems

Year 1

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter
Summer Quarter

Course Credits
AGR 101 2
AGR261 5
ANTH& 100 5
ENGL& 101 5

Course Credits
ART& 100 5
BOT 130 5
CMST& 220 5
ECON& 202 5

Course Credits
AGR 271 5
ECON& 201 5
PSYC& 100 or SOC& 101 5

Course Credits
AGR 295 5
AGR 297 1

Year 2

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter

Course Credits
AGR 241 5
CHEM& 161 5
FAD 150 2
MATH& 141 5

Course Credits
AGR 263 5
CHEM& 162 5
MATH& 146 5

Course Credits
CHEM& 163 5
MATH& 148 5
HIST& 116 or 118 5

AAS-T Agricultural Science (WSU transfer: Agricultural Technology & Production Management)

Total Credits: 
Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will be able to communicate clearly and effectively within a workplace context.
  • Students will be able to reason mathematically using methods appropriate to the profession.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate teamwork and/or workplace specific skills related to human relations.
  • Students will demonstrate critical-thinking and problem-solving skills as they make decisions in
    agricultural management situations
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of scientific principles when applied to a variety of crop production systems

Year 1

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter

Course Credits
AGR 101 2
AGR 261 5
ECON& 201 5
ECON& 101 5

Course Credits
AGR 272 5
ART& 100 5
BOT 130 5
FAD 150 2

Course Credits
AGR 251 5
AGR 271 5
CMST& 220 5
HIST& 116 or 118 5

Year 2

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter

Course Credits
AGR 241 5
CHEM& 161 5
MATH& 146 5

Course Credits
AGR 263 5
ANTH& 100 5
CHEM& 162 5

Course Credits
AGR 212 5
CHEM& 163 5
PSYC& 100 or SOC& 101 5

AAS-T Agriculture (transfer)

Emphasis: Agriculture
Total Credits: 
94
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of scientific principles when applied to a variety of crop production systems.
  2. Students will demonstrate application of agricultural knowledge and resources to solve problems and perform relevant activities.
  3. Students will demonstrate critical-thinking and problem-solving skills as they make decisions in agricultural management situations.
  4. Students will be able to communicate clearly and effectively within a workplace context.
  5. Students will be able to reason mathematically using methods appropriate to the profession.
  6. Students will be able to demonstrate teamwork and/or workplace specific skills related to human relations.

Year 1

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter
Summer Quarter (optional)

Course Credits
AGR 101 – Intro to Ag Industry & Careers 2
AGR 261 – Plant Science 5
ANTH& 100 – Survey of Anthropology 5
ENGL& 101 – Composition I 5

Course Credits
AGR elective 5
BOT 130 – Botany 5
ECON& 201 – Microeconomics 5

Course Credits
ART& 100 – Art Appreciation 5
CMST& 220 – Public Speaking 5
MATH& 146 – Intro to Statistics 5

Course Credits
AGR Work-based electives  

Year 2

Fall Quarter
Winter Quarter
Spring Quarter

Course Credits
AGR elective 5
CHEM& 161 – General Chemistry 5
HIST& 116 Western Civilization I or
HIST& 118 Western Civilization III
5

Course Credits
AGR 263 – Soils 5
CHEM& 162 – General Chemistry 5
PSYC& 100 General Psychology or
SOC& 101 Intro to Sociology
5

Course Credits
AGR elective 5
CHEM& 163 – General Chemistry 5
FAD 150 – Industrial First Aid & CPR 2

Certificate of Achievement - Agronomy

Emphasis: Agronomy
Total Credits: 
53
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will demonstrate critical-thinking and problem-solving skills as they make decisions in agricultural management situations.
  2. Students will apply plant and soils science concepts to crop production.
  3. Students will be able to demonstrate teamwork and/or workplace specific skills related to human relations.
  4. Students will be able to reason mathematically using methods appropriate to the profession.
Related Instruction
Certificate Core

Course Credits
BUS 120 – Human Relations on the Job (4 credits) or
PSYC& 100 – General Psychology (5 credits) or
SOC& 100 – Introduction to Sociology (5 credits)
4-5
CMST 100 – Human Communications (4 credits) or
CMST& 210 – Interpersonal Communications (5 credits) or
CMST& 220 – Public Speaking (5 credits)
4-5
ENGL 109 – Applied Technical Writing (3 credits) or
ENGL& 101 – Composition I (5 credits)
3-5
FAD 150 – Industrial First Aid & CPR (2 credits) 2
MAP 117 – Applied Math for Workforce Programs (5 credits) 5

Course Credits
AGR 101 – Orientation to Ag Industries & Careers 2
AGR 110 – Water Management in Agriculture 3
AGR 211 – Ag Weeds Identification and Controls 5
AGR 251 – Integrated Pest Management 5
AGR 261 – Plant Science 5
AGR 263 – Soils 5
AGR 265 – Crop Production 5
CHEM& 105 – Chemical Concepts 5

Certificate of Achievement - Agricultural Business

Emphasis: Business
Total Credits: 
45
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will demonstrate critical-thinking and problem-solving skills as they make decisions in agricultural management situations.
  2. Students will demonstrate knowledge of business principles when applied to agricultural businesses and operations.
  3. Students will be able to communicate clearly and effectively within a workplace context.
  4. Students will be able to reason mathematically using methods appropriate to the profession.
  5. Students will be able to demonstrate teamwork and/or workplace specific skills related to human relations.
Related Instruction
Certificate Core

Course Credits
BUS 120 – Human Relations on the Job (4 credits) or
PSYC& 100 – General Psychology (5 credits) or
SOC& 100 – Introduction to Sociology (5 credits)
4-5
CMST 100 – Human Communications (4 credits) or
CMST& 210 – Interpersonal Communications (5 credits) or
CMST& 220 – Public Speaking (5 credits)
4-5
ENGL 109 – Applied Technical Writing (3 credits) or
ENGL& 101 – Composition I (5 credits)
3-5
FAD 150 – Industrial First Aid & CPR 2
BUS 102 – Business Mathematics 5

Course Credits
AGR 101 – Introduction to Ag Industry & Careers 2
AGR 241 – Farm & Ranch Management 5
AGR 271 – Ag Sales & Marketing 5
ACCT 105 – Introduction to Accounting 5
BUS& 101 – Introduction to Business 5
BUS 170 – Consumer Finance 5

Agriculture Contact
Agriculture Faculty & Staff
Coordinator & advisor, Ethan Tonnemaker

Tonnemaker, Ethan

Agriculture, Ag Mechanics, UAS Program Coordinator
EthanT@bigbend.edu
(509) 793-2117
Sustainable Ag & Food Systems Instructor, Jaime Sackmann

Sackmann, Jaime

Agriculture Associate Faculty
JaimeS@bigbend.edu
Logo of Big Bend Thor

Ramirez, Christian

Associate Faculty Crop Science
ChristianRa@bigbend.edu
Ag & Economics Instructor, Terry Pyle

Pyle, Terry

Agriculture & Economics Faculty
TerryP@bigbend.edu
(509) 793-2186
Chemistry and Agriculture Faculty, Aaron Mahoney

Mahoney, Aaron

Agriculture Instructor
aaronm@bigbend.edu
Plant Science Instructor, Necia Bair

Bair, Necia

Agriculture Associate Faculty
NeciaB@bigbend.edu
Soils Instructor, Kyle Bair

Bair, Kyle

Agriculture Associate Faculty
KyleB@bigbend.edu
Additional Links
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